Research

Research at MTC explicitly embraces the fact that the challenges in developing a viable working system of connected and automated vehicles are not just technical.  Integrated with the three planned deployments are four cross-cutting themes, each of which has specific thrusts:

The University Partners diagram

  • Technology
    • Connectivity
    • Automation
    • Vehicle design
    • Infrastructure design
    • ITS interoperability
    • Human factors
    • Standards
  • Risk Management
    • Cybersecurity
    • Regulatory issues
    • Legal issues
    • Interaction of equipped and non-equipped vehicles
  • Customer Value
    • Safety
    • Congestion reduction
    • Business model and process
    • Vehicle sharing
    • Smart parking
    • Accessibility
  • Societal Impact
    • ITS interoperability
    • Public policy
    • Urban planning
    • System modeling and analytics
    • Energy and emissions

Below is a list of the faculty projects chosen for funding under the auspices of the MTC:

  • Survey and Framework Development for Legal and Regulatory Issues Arising from Automated Vehicle Technologies
  • Cybersecurity Roadmap for Automated Cars
  • Examination of Operator State Monitoring and Operator Engagement Approaches as Strategies for Mitigating Human Factors Challenges Associated with Transfer-of-Control During Automated Driving
  • Remote Intrusion Detection and Prevention for Connected Vehicles
  • An Investigation of Drivers' Adaptation Behavior and Decision Making When Interacting with Automated and Connected Vehicle Technologies
  • An Application of Current Legal Precedents on Fault and Liability Crashes Involving Automated Motor Vehicles
  • Consumers' Response to Automated Vehicles
  • Age-related Differences in Driver Behavior Associated with Automated Vehicles and the Transfer of Control Between Automated and Manual Control: A Simulator Evaluation
  • Intelligent Parking Guidance System based on Connected Vehicle Sensor Networks Roadmap of autonomous vehicle deployment priorities in Ann Arbor
  • Improving the fuel economy of heavy-duty vehicles using vehicle-to-vehicle communication
  • Road Map of Autonomous Vehicle Deployment Priorities in Ann Arbor
  • Cybersecurity Testing Center
  • The driver in the driverless car:  Simulating vehicle automation for evaluation of driver behavior and performance
  • Development of DSRC radios upon the IEEE 802.11p standard and physical layer security for automated and connected vehicle operations
  • Mobile data mining for intelligent transportation
  • Dynamic Map Update Using Connected Vehicle Data
  • Fuel economy optimization of heavy-duty vehicles using connected vehicle technologies
  • Vehicle Data Collection for Cloud Processing
  • Towards One Million Miles of Pedestrian Detection and Avoidance:  Truly Robust Multi-Sensor Safety Systems
  • The Development of Augmented Vehicle Pedestrian Connection for Decision-Making in Autonomous Driving and Pedestrian Safety
  • Secure Automated Vehicle Platooning
  • Towards centimeter-accurate localization using low cost GPS:  algorithms for data fusing with V2X
  • Development of Evaluation Approaches and the Certificate System for Automated Vehicles Based on the Accelerated Evaluation
  • Evaluation of the Efficacy of Multiple Training Strategies on Drivers' Safe Operation and Trust Calibration of Level 2 & 3 Automated Vehicle Systems
  • Explanations and Expectations:  Trust Building in Autonomous Vehicles
  • Cybersecurity of Transportation Infrastructure in a CV Environment
  • Studying Interactions between Motor Vehicles and Bicyclists under existing Infrastructure using Large Scale Naturalistic Driving Data
  • Quantifying Passenger Susceptibility to Motion Sickness to Guide the Design of Automated Vehicles
  • Efficient Human-in-the-Loop Computer Vision Algorithms to Create Datasets of Rare Traffic Events from Video
  • Expand Deployment of Applications for Vulnerable Road Users for Pillar 1
  • Mcity Infrastructure Data Collection and Management System Development